7 Best Practices For Periscope

7 best practices for periscope

Today we’re going to focus on Periscope, a new platform that is becoming more and more useful and relevant for people and organizations!

Below are some practices for this platform that I hope you will find helpful.

Be aware of environment and surroundings.

Because the broadcasts on Periscope is live, it’s important that you are intentional about choosing a place and time that reduces the risk of issues arising during the broadcast. Periscope wisely by paying attention to your surroundings before you go live. Someone could come by and say inappropriate things or interrupt you in some way, and you definitely do not want something to happen that could damage your ministry’s image or name.

Pay attention to your phone service and wi-fi reception.

I have watched plenty of Periscope broadcasts where this has been a problem. Sometimes it is hard to control, especially if you are outside or riding in a car, but it is important to do your best to assure good service during your broadcasts. The last thing you want is for your video to cut out in the middle of something important you’re discussing and not know that it is not working for your viewer.

Announce it beforehand.

Twitter will send out a notification when you go live in addition to the Periscope app sending a notification to your followers, but it is also good to send out an invitation on social networks to join you on Periscope before you go live. You may do this an hour, 30 minutes, and/or 5 minutes before you go live, just to give your viewers a heads up.

Plan your conversation.

Periscope is one of those platforms where you have to keep your viewer’s attention. A great way to prepare for success is to make sure there is a list of things you’re planning to talk about, and to remind your audience of the flow of conversation for those joining sporadically. Having a list of topics or talking points will help prevent you from rambling and being disorganized and uninteresting.

Acknowledge your audience.

The majority of your audience most likely will not show up on your live broadcast until a minute or so has passed of you speaking. Be mindful of the people joining (you’ll see each one pop up as they join) and welcome them by name if you can! When they ask questions, answer them as quickly as possible and make it relevant to as many people as you can.

Be on the lookout for trolls.

As on any other social network, trolls may pop in on your broadcast, possibly with bad language or rude comments. Never fear! Periscope allows you to block users from your broadcasts easily by holding your finger down on their name and choosing to block. Just make sure to be cautionary in this and use your wisdom in choosing who to block and who to lovingly answer.

Be authentic and show the back stage.

One of the best aspects of Periscope is the ability for users to join live broadcasts and interact with the person scoping. A great example of a proper use of Periscope is showing the “back stage” of your ministry – your worship team setting up for a Sunday morning, your creative team talking about upcoming planning of events, your pastor or leadership team talking about what’s on their heart that day. Let this platform be a place where you show the authentic and relatable parts of your ministry. This allows your community to feel apart of what you’re doing as an organization and like their questions and comments are heard and known!

Any questions or comments about Periscope? Share them below!

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